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DigiCULT 11
crucial challenge in the exploitation of the Internet:
the capability for reusing pre-existing media, text and
other digital files.We uncovered case after case of
firms that use multimedia databases to store and
retrieve reusable media and text.
In their development of the 777 aeroplane, Boeing
used a multimedia database of technical diagrams
used in documentation to save 1400 engineering
hours and over one million dollars in related expen-
ses. In another instance, a small multimedia CD-ROM
publisher convinced Disney to invest $8 million dollars
for 10 per cent of the firm (giving that small firm an
$80 million valuation five full years before the wild
valuation of the dot.com era).This small Wisconsin
multimedia developer showed Disney how a database
of 30,000 reusable media assets saved 13 weeks and
$70,000 in direct cost for the Lion King CD-ROM,
and could do the same for other Disney titles.
In 1995 Apple Computer commissioned our firm
to publish a series of white papers on best practice
for digital media production.This included the semi-
nal white paper on media asset management, soon
thereafter renamed digital asset management.
faction) while still reducing the cost of content pro-
duction for Websites?
Digital asset management consists of three basic
functions: 1) a searchable repository of reusable
media, text and other digital files; 2) automation
of enterprise publishing workflows; 3) delivery of
personalised or self-service satisfaction to any
authorised user.
The functions combine to accelerate the process
cycle time of a firm.This means that a firm can
bring a product or service more quickly to market,
especially across multiple geographies or languages.
It means that a firm can reduce the cost of serving
customers, giving them ways to answer their own
questions, or ask better or more informed questions
of the right people. It also means that a firm can
bring new `digital products' (constructed from digital
components or assets) to individual customers and
charge them an appropriate price.
In short, digital asset management fuels the engi-
nes of commerce, the traditional offline and newer
online parts of a firm. DAM enables great firms to
use the Internet to do the same one or two things
brilliantly, only faster, cheaper and better. DAM sup-
ports the automation of enterprise publishing and
the codification of best practice for digital media
production.
W
hat is digital asset management, or DAM
for short? And how can cultural heritage
institutions use DAM to better serve
their stakeholders (the delivery of self-service satis-
DIGITAL ASSET MANAGEMENT
HOW DAM AUTOMATES THE DELIVERY
OF IMAGES TO AUTHORISED USERS
The figure below depicts the delivery of personalised
or self-service satisfaction to a user of a DAM-
enabled workflow.
REUSE
STANDARDS
REUSABLE FILE
METADATA
STANDARDS
. PRISM
. DUBLIN CORE
. SCORM
DIGITAL ASSET
REPOSITORY
. CHECK IN/OUT
. VERSION CONTROL
. BUSINESS RULES
(RIGHTS & PERMISSIONS)
ASSET
INVENTORY
RETRIEVAL
ENGINE
PRODUCTION
DATA SOURCES
IMAGE
SERVER
SEARCH
LIVE DATA
DYNAMIC
IMAGING
METADATA
CONTAINER
. FILE ATTRIBUTES
. WORKFLOW STATUS
. SUBJECT MATTER
. KEYWORDS
. BUSINESS RULES
. PROFILE, CREDITS
. METADATA
. VISUAL PATTERNS &
ATTRIBUTES
MEDIUM RES FOR SLIDES
HIGH RES FOR PRINT
LOW RES FOR WEB
2002 MICHAEL MOON