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types of digital entities (multilingual and
multicultural content, sheet music and
medical data all under one roof), and to
provide unlimited and enjoyable access to
these collections through novel, highly
interactive navigation means, personali-
sation mechanisms, easy-to-use user inter-
faces and smart and ambient technologies,
i.e. those challenges that are today labelled
as `intelligent heritage'.
F
rom a research perspective, intelligent
heritage, according to Prof. David
Arnold, University of Brighton, UK, is a
mixture of `hot topics' and the challenge
of `making it stick'.With regards to the
hot research topics to make applications
more efficient and effective, domain
knowledge of the cultural heritage sector
is the key as it raises the research challenge.
`It is not language technologies per se, but
language technologies for cultural heritage
digital content, the provision of intelligent
heritage, the preservation and long-time
archiving of digital heritage content and
the involvement of community memory.
Sixteen EU projects were invited to pre-
sent their research agenda within these
areas.
F
or the digital libraries sector, one of
the main impediments to development
is the fragmented approach that has resulted
in the development of many different
technical solutions to the same problems.
Thus, the greatest challenge in the future
will be to get industry interested in this
small market, to create off-the-shelf, out-
of-the-box solutions that are cheap and
self-sustainable and can be easily adapted
even by small institutions. Additional topics
on the research agenda of digital libraries
are the ability to build large-scale collec-
tions that also embrace non-traditional
DigiCULT
.
Info
12
W
hat should be the research agenda
for cultural heritage in the up-
coming calls of the Sixth Framework
Programme? This was the leading
question at a concertation meeting that
took place on January 28 in Luxembourg
at the invitation of the European
Commission Directorate E Interfaces,
Knowledge and Content Technologies,
Applications, Information Market, and
brought together over a hundred resear-
chers from all over Europe who were
interested to hear the answer.
A
ccording to Director Horst Forster,
at present, there seem to be more
questions than answers regarding what the
future focus of IST funded research
should be. Only within a few areas, which
also constitute the mainstay of cultural
heritage, is the research agenda relatively
clearly plotted: the generation of masses of
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