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DigiCULT
.
Info
15
timedia CD-ROMs.The conference
opened with papers charting the issues
that would be addressed during the
coming five days as well as international
developments. Among the papers Professor
M. Morbey's (York University, Canada) on
`Cybercolonialism in the State Hermitage
Museum, St Petersburg, Russia: Does it
Matter?' struck a genuine chord with the
audience. In the course of the middle two
days, speakers examined a range of issues,
from improving access to cultural heritage
using information technologies including
the Internet to the development of audio,
video and photo archives and collections.A
number of authors examined the collabora-
tive opportunities between the cultural
heritage sector and business and the role
that information resources of this kind
played in the devel-
opment of the information society.The
focus of Thursday's sessions on presenting
information resources
from the regions was a
welcome antidote to
the prevalence of
Russia's leading centres
Moscow and St. Peters-
burg in presentations
and discussions.These
and other presentations
demonstrated how
cultural institutions can
collaborate with ven-
dors, universities and
local authorities to use
technology to preserve
and improve access to
and understanding of
cultural heritage. On
the final day of the
conference, projects on
international coopera-
tion, such as the
Cultivate project, were
brought into the spotlight. One of the
most inspiring sessions of the conference,
on contemporary art and the Internet, follo-
wed. Participants examined such questions
as: How do you define the ethical bounda-
ries of contemporary art?
I
n addition to addressing challenging
questions, the conference, in the good
former Soviet tradition, was richly supple-
mented by the opportunity for visitors to
take part in a variety of cultural visits. By
combining discussions of culture and tech-
nology with visits to the cultural institu-
tions themselves, the hosts reminded us
that technology must still take pride of
place from the heritage assets themselves,
even if in some cases contemporary art is
blurring the distinction between technolo-
gy and art.
B
Y
P
I E T E R
K
O P
, IBM B
U S I N E S S
C
O N S U LT I N G
S
E R V I C E S
R
E P O R T O N T H E
F
I F T H
I
N T E R N AT I O N A L
C
O N F E R E N C E
E VA 2 0 0 2
M
OSCOW
2 7 D
ECEMBER
2002
V
ASARI
1
and the Centre of
Information in the Sphere of Culture
of the Ministry of Culture of the Russian
Federation (Centre PIC
2
) brought to
Moscow the foremost European electronic
imaging event in the visual arts.The main
supporters were the EC's EVAN Project,
the Open Society Institute (Soros
Foundation - Russia) and the Russian
Foundation for Basic Research.The 700
participants had the opportunity to sample
168 presentations over the course of the
five-day event. As in previous years, the
Tretyakov Gallery, the home to paintings
by such exceptional Russian artists as
Vladimir Borovikovsky (1757-1825),Vasily
Tropinin (1776-1857), Pavel Fedotov
(1815-1852), Kuzma Petrov-Vodkin
(1878-1939) and Kasimir Malevich (1878-
1935) proved an intellectually stimulating
venue.The presentations were accompanied
by an exhibition of new software and mul-
Centre PIC, Moscow 2002,Tretyakov Gallery
1 http://www.vasari.co.uk/
2 http://www.cpic.ru/Index_e.htm