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DigiCULT
OIL - Ontology Inference Layer
OIL is a proposal for a Web-based representation
and inference layer for ontologies. It uses a layered
approach to defining a standard ontology language.
Each layer adds functionality and complexity to the
previous layer.This is done such that machines that
can only process a lower layer can still partially
understand high-level ontologies. See:
http://www.ontoknowledge.org/oil/
A white paper on OIL functions: `An informal
description of Standard OIL and Instance OIL', by
the On-To-Knowledge group led by Department of
Computer Science, University of Manchester, UK,
28 November 2000, www.ontoknowledge.org/
oil/downl/oil-whitepaper.pdf
Ontologies
Ontology research: Laboratory for Applied Ontology
(LOA), Institute of Cognitive Sciences and Techno-
logy (ISTC),
http://www.ladseb.pd.cnr.it/infor/ontology/
ontology.html
Dieter Fensel: Ontologies: A Silver Bullet for
Knowledge Management and Electronic Commerce.
New York, Springer, 2001.
`Ontology Infrastructure for the Semantic Web',
includes detailed subject bibliography. WonderWeb
Project, Department of Computer Science,Victoria
University of Manchester, UK,
http://wonderweb.semanticweb.org/deliverables/
documents/D15.pdf
Standard Upper Ontology (SUO): An upper
ontology for data interoperability, information
search and retrieval, automated inferencing, and
natural language processing. IEEE Standard Upper
Ontology (SUO) Working Group,
http://suo.ieee.org/
OWL - Web Ontology Language
The Web Ontology Language is a semantic markup
language for publishing and sharing ontologies on
the World Wide Web. OWL is developed as a
vocabulary extension of the Resource Description
Framework (RDF) and is derived from the
DAML+OIL Web Ontology Language. For the
development of this language, see the documents
of the Web Ontology (WebOnt) Working Group,
http://www.w3.org/2001/sw/WebOnt/
See also OWL Web Ontology Language Refer-
ence (W3C Working Draft 31 March 2003) at
http://www.w3.org/TR/owl-ref), and OWL Web
Ontology Language Guide (W3C Working Draft 31
March 2003), http://www.w3.org/TR/owl-guide/.
For an understanding of the goals, requirements
and usage scenarios for a Web ontology language, see:
`Web Ontology Language (OWL) Use Cases and
Requirements' (W3C working draft, 31 March
2003), http://www.w3.org/TR/webont-req/
RDF - Resource Description Framework
See Cultural Heritage Semantic Web Example &
Primer, pp. 32-34.
Semantic Web
`The Semantic Web',Tim Berners-Lee with James
Hendler and Ora Lassila, Scientific American, May
2001, http://www.sciam.com/2001/0501issue/
0501berners-lee.html
`Enhanced: Science and the Semantic Web', J. A.
Hendler, in: Science magazine,Volume 299, Number
5606, 24 January 2003, pp. 520-521.
`Peer-to-Peer:The Infrastructure for the Semantic
Web', Stanford University.The Semantic Web as the
next evolutionary step of the Internet,
http://p2p.semanticweb.org