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I
t is only in comparatively recent years that the
cultural and scientific heritage sector has awoken
to the need for reciprocal access and inter-
operability among its curatorial domains.Whether
for collections management, bibliographic access or
inventory control, archives, libraries and museums
have followed similar but often mutually
incompatible standards of description for the
resources in their collections. As more and more of
these descriptions, and indeed in many cases actual
resources, have been made available on the Internet,
it has become clear that the end-user is not interested
in the historic, scientific or political reasons why the
stuff they are seeking may only be disclosed via one
or other resource description format: they simply
want seamless access to the stuff itself.This realisation
has led to the development of standards and protocols
for cross-domain resource discovery, and in particular
to the widespread adoption of the Dublin Core set
of metadata elements.
During the same time period the educational
technology community has been working to develop
models for the delivery of content for learning in the
digital age.The concept of the Virtual Learning
DigiCULT 7
L
EARNING
O
BJECTS FOR THE
C
ULTURAL
AND
S
CIENTIFIC
H
ERITAGE
S
ECTOR
:
A P
OSITION
P
APER
By Bruce Royan
Environment (VLE) has arisen, which exists to
deliver, in a seamless fashion, learning material and
communication in digital form. Managed Learning
Environments (MLEs) extend that concept to
encompass some of the administrative aspects of a
course, such as registration, progress monitoring,
examinations, etc.The content for delivery through
both of these concepts is increasingly defined in
terms of Learning Objects, and the community has
come to use a mnemonic, `RAID', for the attributes
such learning objects should possess: they should be
Reusable (able to be modified and used in many
different learning situations), Accessible (able to be
indexed and found as needed), Interoperable
(operable across a wide variety of hardware, delivery
environments and tools), and Durable (continuing
despite changes in versions of system software, players
and plug-ins).
The attributes of Learning Objects so closely
match the attributes generally believed to be desirable
for digital cultural content that it would seem
sensible for managers in the cultural heritage field to
be aware of these developments.
Digicult_THI4_backup_13_10_03 24.10.2003 11:54 Uhr Seite 7