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DigiCULT
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- Scottish Screen Archive (http://www.
scottishscreen.com/)
English regional collections:
- East Anglian Film Archive (http://www.
uea.ac.uk/eafa/)
- Media Archive for Central England
(http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/
film/mace/)
- North West Film Archive (http://www.
nwfa.mmu.ac.uk/)
- Northern Region Film and Television
Archive (http://www.nrfta.org.uk/)
- South East Film and Video Archive
(http://www.brighton.ac.uk/sefva/)
- The South West Film and Television
Archive (http://www.tswfta.co.uk/)
- Wessex Film and Sound Archive
(http://www.hants.gov.uk/record-
office/film/)
- Yorkshire Film Archive (http://www.
yorksj. ac.uk/dialect/yorkshire_film_
archive.htm)
NEW RESOURCES FROM THE IAML UK
AND IRELAND BRANCH
T
here has been a lot of recent activity
at the UK and Ireland branch of the
International Association of Music
Libraries, Archives and Documentation
Centres (IAML), beginning with a celebra-
tion of the branch's Golden Jubilee.
T
he IAML (http://www.cilea.it/
music/iaml/iamlhome.htm) has
around 2000 individual and institutional
members in forty-five countries through-
out the world, although most members are
European or North American. Founded in
1951 to promote international co-opera-
tion and to support the interests of the
profession, IAML is a respected member
of the international library and music
communities.
ticular and will increase awareness of the
value of the UK's film and video archives
in teaching and understanding film.
T
he Website provides information
about all twelve of the UK's public
sector moving image archives including
access procedures, facilities and services, as
well as study tools such as academic
research case studies and guidance on
understanding the collections. Moving
History gives an overview of the content
of each collection and features descriptive
and contextual data on over 100 selected
clips from the archives. It also acts as a
gateway to the archives themselves and
related organisations and collections.
A
s a result of research initiated by the
Arts and Humanities Research Board
Centre for British Film and Television
Studies (http://www.bftv.ac.uk), a two-
year project led by the South East Film
and Video Archive (SEFVA: http://www.
brighton.ac.uk/sefva/) led to Moving
History being created.The project sought
to address and rectify the issue that under-
funding film collections results in a lack of
academic research and the consequent
under-valuing of these resources as power-
ful artistic, historical and sociological study
tools. A full description of the project can
be found at http://www.bftv.ac.uk/proj
ects/sefva.htm.
UK national collections:
- bfi National Film and Television Archive
(http://www.bfi.org.uk/collections/)
- Imperial War Museum Film and Video
Archive (http://www.iwm.org.uk/col
lections/film.htm)
- National Screen and Sound Archive of
Wales (http://screenandsound.llgc.
org.uk/)
NEW REPORT ON UK ARCHIVES
R
esource, the UK Council for
Museums, Archives and Libraries,
(http://www.resource.gov.uk/) has pub-
lished online a new report dealing with
the effective long-term management of
digital records and the current situation in
the UK. "Archives in the Digital Age" can be
downloaded from http://www.resource.
gov.uk/information/tenders/completed.asp,
project ID 435.The study considers cur-
rent research and frameworks and the spe-
cific needs of archives in addition to
obstacles to progress and the legal environ-
ment. For more information, e-mail:
emma.halsall@resource.gov.uk.
NEW MOVING IMAGE ARCHIVE
RESOURCE
A
rchival film and television material
provides a unique and rich resource
for academic study, teaching and research
as well as for artistic projects.The UK has
twelve public sector moving images
archives at both national and regional lev-
els who are dedicated to providing the
widest possible public access to all pre-
served materials and to furthering the use
of their collections in learning, teaching
and research. Several of these collections
are based in Higher Education institutes
and the film archive community seeks to
maintain its good links with the academic
sector.
O
n this note, a new resource for UK
film and video archives has been
produced and is now available online.
Moving History (http://www.movinghis
tory.ac.uk) is a Website aimed at academic
communities in the arts and humanities
sectors. It is hoped that Moving History
will promote scholarly research into mov-
ing image material and archive film in par-
N
EWS FROM
UK A
RCHIVES