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DigiCULT
.
Info
16
by French companies AJLSM and Anaphore
as a generic platform for searching and
browsing XML/EAD archival finding aids.
A detailed report on the functionality and
development of Pleade follows.
T
he second tool, Navimages
(http://sdx.archivesdefrance.culture.gou
v.fr/gpl/navimages/index.html), enables users
to manage, view, search and browse a series
of digital images. It is composed of three
modules (the image collector, document
base, and image viewer) and was designed
to be closely compatible with Pleade.
T
he new software was presented to
cultural heritage and information
professionals and will become well recog-
nised as an aid to collection management.
Objects can be submitted to the repository
in XML and are persistently stored in the
repository as XML files.The Fedora exten-
sion of the METS schema can be viewed
at http://www.fedora.info/definitions/
1/0/mets-fedora-ext.xsd.
T
he system is currently being tested by
some North American institutions.
For more information and to download
the Fedora software, visit
http://www.fedora.info/.
PLEADE AND NAVIMAGES
T
wo new open-source tools were
unveiled on 7 October 2003 by the
Centre historique des Archives nationales
(CHAN, http://www.archivesnationales.
culture.gouv.fr/chan/).The first, Pleade
(http://www.pleade.org/), was developed
FEDORA
T
he Fedora Project (http://www.fedo
ra.info/), a joint venture between
Cornell University and the University of
Virginia, has released an open-source digi-
tal object repository management system.
Based on the Flexible Extensible Digital
Object Repository Architecture (FEDORA),
the system can support a repository con-
taining one million objects, managed via a
graphical user interface.The management
and access APIs are implemented as
SOAP-enabled Web services and among
other features include an OAI Metadata
Harvesting Provider.
F
edora digital objects conform to an
extension of the Metadata Encoding
and Transmission Standard (METS,
http://www.loc.gov/standards/mets/).
N
EW
O
PEN
-
SOURCE
S
OFTWARE FOR
C
ONTENT AND
R
EPOSITORY
M
ANAGEMENT
BACK TO PAGE 1
M
ARTIN
S
ÉVIGNY
, AJLSM, &
F
LORENCE
C
LAVAUD
,
C
ENTRE HISTORIQUE DES
A
RCHIVES NATIONALES
O
n 7 October in Paris, the PLEADE
project was presented during a spe-
cial meeting open to all cultural heritage
professionals in France and elsewhere and
to their private partners. PLEADE will
help institutions put archival finding aids
encoded in EAD on the Web, by providing
a set of tools to build dynamic Websites.
E
AD ­ Encoded Archival Description
12
­ is technically an XML data format
for archival finding aids. However, for
archivists and archival institutions, these
three letters have a lot more meaning and
EAD can easily be qualified as a real
enabling technology. One of the first rea-
sons is that EAD is an international and
generic data model, maintained by a large
working group where archival professionals
and IT specialists meet, and where user
needs drive the evolution process.
Moreover, this data model is now com-
pletely compatible with the ISAD(G) ­
General International Standard Archival
Description ­ conceptual model, published
in 1993 by the International Council on
Archives and used worldwide.
13
The two
standards are based on the principle of
multilevel archival description, leading to
hierarchical finding aids.These characteris-
tics have quickly put EAD in front, and
this model is used today by a wide variety
of institutions with archival holdings.
P
LEADE is more than a software
component; it is a project and, more
importantly, an open-source project. It
means that the software itself is distributed
with an open-source licence (namely the
GPL) and the sources (including docu-
mentation and examples) are available
online.
P
LEADE was initially developed by, and
is supported by, two private companies:
ˇ Anaphore (Barbentane, France,
http://www.arkheia.net), the leading
PLEADE ­ EAD
FOR THE
W
EB
12 For information about the EAD, please visit the Official EAD Website at the Library of Congress:
http://www.loc.gov/ead/.
13 The standard is available online: http://www.ica.org/biblio.php?pdocid=1.