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DigiCULT
.
Info
45
N
CD established a journal, called
Review of the National Centre for
Digitisation, which is published both in
electronic and in printed form (http://
www.ncd.matf.bg.ac.yu/?page=publica
tions&lang=en).The journal publishes
papers (mostly in Serbian) concerning all
aspects of digitisation of cultural and scien-
tific heritage.Two national conferences
under the name `New Technologies and
Standards: Digitisation of National Heritage'
were organised in 2002 and 2003 (www.
ncd.matf.bg.ac.yu/?page=conferences&lan
g=en), presenting local experiences with
new technologies, standards and the other
fields in the area of digitisation.
and the tools for storage, processing and
presentation of the digitised data. During
the digitisation process, models of a dis-
tributed information system for digitised
cultural and scientific heritage and specific
software that follows the above standards
should be developed.The models should
allow dissemination and wide access over
the Internet to cultural and scientific val-
ues that at present are not easily accessible.
These systems should be as compatible as
possible. Collaborators from cultural and
scientific institutions ought to use the soft-
ware both as end-users and as experts who
define metadata for corresponding objects
and enter information into databases.
libraries, archives, monument protection,
standardisation, data protection, etc.);
establishing, at the national level, a basic
set of standards in the area of digitisation
of cultural and scientific heritage;
developing models of the appropriate
distributed information systems and
specific software for the realisation of
digitisation standards;
connecting cultural and research institu-
tions involved in the digitisation project
into a particular Internet subnet and
developing a network of information
and WWW servers;
securing long-term storage and mainte-
nance of digitised heritage;
organising continuous, persistent and
systematic work on cultural and scientific
heritage digitisation;
training collaborators from cultural and
scientific institutions;
collaboration with similar institutions
from abroad.
T
he activities illustrate the multidisci-
plinary character of the NCD. For
example, the issue of standards in the area
of digitisation of cultural and scientific
heritage concerns data and metadata for-
mats and structures, access protocols, rights
management, thesauri, search procedures,
DIGICULT REGIONAL CORRESPONDENTS:
Warm thanks go to all of our Regional Correspondents:
Bulgaria Milena
Dobreva
Czech Republic
Adolf Knoll
France
Muriel Foulonneau
Greece Efthimios
Mavrikas
Italy Anna
Maria
Tammaro
Poland Maria
Sliwinska
Serbia and Montenegro Zoran Ognjanovic
DigiCULT are still seeking Regional Correspondents for countries not mentioned
above. If you would like to contribute, please contact the DigiCULT.Info content
editor, Daisy Abbott, at D.Abbott@hatii.arts.gla.ac.uk
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SMIL E
XPLAINED
C
ONTINUING ON FROM
D
IGITAL
O
BJECT
I
DENTIFIERS AND
H
UMAN
L
ANGUAGE
T
ECHNOLOGIES IN
D
IGI
CULT.I
NFO
'
S
T
ECHNOLOGIES
E
XPLAINED SERIES
,
D
AISY
A
BBOTT CONSIDERS THE
S
YNCHRONISED
M
EDIA
I
NTEGRATION
L
ANGUAGE
.
WHAT IS SMIL?
T
he Synchronised Media Integration
Language (SMIL, pronounced `smile')
is a mark-up language which supports the
co-ordination of different media displayed
on a Website. SMIL can be thought of as
similar to HTML but with additional tem-
poral definition, controlling placement of
multimedia in both space and time and
therefore allowing both the synchronisa-
tion and integration of various media.
S
MIL was designed as a declarative
format for expressing media synchro-
nisation on the Web as an alternative and
complementary approach to scripting
languages. In March 1997 the first
Working Group was established by
W3C, leading to SMIL 1.0 becoming a
W3C recommendation in June 1998.
HOW DOES IT WORK?
S
MIL, an XML specification, defines a
number of elements and attributes use-
ful for controlling presentation, synchroni-
sation and interactivity. Media components
accessible by URLs are named (tagged)
and their display can be positioned in
space and scheduled in time. Positioning
can be defined similarly to HTML.
Controlling display of media in time is
achieved in two main ways: parallel (e.g.