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DigiCULT
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54
the texts, read or listen to notes explaining
each page or use other features specific to
the individual text.
T
his application allows access to many
more pages than could be viewed if
the manuscripts were simply displayed in a
glass case and, crucially, without the risk of
damage to the original.
T
urning the Pages was launched in
April 1998 and won the BIMA
Interactive Display Award, followed by a
Millennium Product Award and the
National Heritage/NP Museum of the
Year Multimedia Award. Originally based
on touchscreen technology, since 2002 the
Library, together with its commercial part-
ner Armadillo Systems, has developed a
Web version of Turning the Pages.When it
was released using this software, Sultan
Baybars' Qur'an was an immediate success.
A selection of 40 pages from the
Lindisfarne Gospels, with superior func-
tionality, was added in May 2003.
T
urning the Pages at the British
Library (http://www.bl.uk/collec-
tions/treasures/digitisation.html) currently
includes the Lindisfarne Gospels, the
Diamond Sutra, the Sforza Hours, the
Leonardo Notebook, the Golden
Haggadah, the Luttrell Psalter, Elizabeth
Blackwell's Herbal, the Sherborne Missal,
and Sultan Baybars' Qur'an.
will be deposited in archives just like
printed materials. A campaign, led by the
British Library on behalf of the UK's six
legal deposit libraries, brings the law up-
to-date. Since the law was first passed in
1911, the six legal deposit libraries have
been able to collect copies of all printed
material published in the UK. However,
the increasing volume of important mate-
rial published in electronic and other non-
print formats fell outside the scope of the
1911 Act and was not therefore being
comprehensively collected.
T
he adjusted law ensures that non-
print publications can be saved as
part of the published archive, becoming
an important resource in their own right,
and is indicative of the changing attitudes
towards contemporary publishing and its
preservation.
H
ave you ever wished that reading
digitised materials online was more
like reading a real book? The British
Library has developed an interactive appli-
cation called `Turning the Pages', which
allows visitors to virtually `turn' the pages
of rare books and manuscripts.The pages
are animated and appear to obey the laws
of gravity, increasing the realism of the
reading experience. Users can zoom in on
O
verall, DRH2003 justified the excel-
lent reputation this series of confer-
ences has built up over the years. Most
material presented was both accessible
from a position of little familiarity and
challenging enough to engage the interest
of the audience well beyond each session.
The organisation of both the programme
and the social activities was outstanding,
creating a friendly atmosphere of intellec-
tual discourse and allowing both new and
regular attendees an insight into current
theoretical and practical work in the field
of Digital Resources for the Humanities. I
anticipate that DRH2004, to be hosted by
the University of Newcastle, will be a sim-
ilar success.
A
t the end of October, a Private
Members Bill became law with the
result that the UK Legal Deposit Libraries
Act 2003 now provides for secondary leg-
islation to ensure that non-print materials
Sculpture at Park Campus
N
EW
UK L
AW FOR
P
RESERVATION OF
E
LECTRONIC
P
UBLICATIONS
BACK TO PAGE 1
BACK TO PAGE 1
T
URNING THE
P
AGES
Screenshot
showing the
Lindisfarne
Gospel viewed
with Turning
the Pages.
BACK TO PAGE 1
Cop
y
r
ight
The Br
itish Libr
ar
y
DigiCUL
T
,
Daisy
Abbott,
2003