background image
.Info
A Newsletter on Digital Culture
Issue 7
ISSN 1609-3941
April 2004
DigiCULT
.
Info
1
News from DigiCULT´s Regional Correspondents ...
Greece
Hungary
Italy
Lithuania
Netherlands
Poland
Serbia and Montenegro
Technology explained and applied ...
La Dama De Elche: Digital Technology in Conservation
Using RFID Smart Tags for Ambient Learning and Teaching
The Service-based Architecture of the MOBILearn Project
Creating Smart Space for Learning
Challenges, strategic issues, new initiatives ...
A New Marketplace of Ideas ­ Harnessing Virtual
Communities to Build New Symbiotic Relationships.
The AER Project (Spanish Archives on the Net)
Digitisation of the Guida Generale Degli Archivi
Di Stato Italiani
XENA: Electronic Normalising Tool
Possibilities and Management of our Digital Assets
The TECA Project: Ecumencial Testimonies at the
Cittadella of Assisi
News, events ...
DigiCULT User Survey 2003
Open Source Tools
The Paper and Ink of the Future?
Workshop European Cultural Heritage: RTD Challenges
Ahead
DRH2004, Digital Resources for the Humanities
DigiCULT Online Resources
Distributed Proofreading
New Report on the Information Landscape
World Summit on the Information Society
31
33
33
34
10
33
34
INTRODUCTION
38
38
For subscription to DigiCULT.Info please go to:
http://www.digicult.info
16
20
14
11
31
41
24
29
40
40
35
41
I
n previous issues
of DigiCULT.Info
and in Technology
Watch Report 1 (2003)
DigiCULT examined
the issues of 3-dimen-
sional representations
of cultural artefacts
and spaces. In this
issue the team from
Factum Arte describe
the creation of a phys-
ical 3D replica of La
Dama de Elche. The
story of the sculpture
is well-known as is the impact of its discovery on development of
Iberian archaeology. The bust, found on the 4th of August 1897
during agricultural work to create terraces for pomegranate trees at
Alcudia, was sold within days to the Louvre and b y the end of that
month was on its way to Paris.There it remained until it was moved
before Hitler's invasion of Paris for safekeeping to the south of
France. Early in 1941 following negotiations between the Spanish
and Vichy governments the sculpture was returned to Spain. By late
June 1941 it was on display at the Prado. Eventually it was moved to
the Museo Arqueológico (Room 20) where it now rests behind
protective glass. From soon after its return General Franco took
advantage of the iconic power of the sculpture as symbolic of the
rich and ancient cultural identity and legacy of the Iberians.
Continued next page
43
5
32
42
44
© Factum
Ar
te
,
2004,
www
.f
actum-ar
te
.com