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DigiCULT
.
Info
22
ject _ especially in the Smollet example
described above: a CD-ROM on cities in a
past century. Eighteenth-century Britain is
represented in an extremely modern dig-
ital frame, an environment which points to
its own systemacity. Like any other mode
of representation, the multimedia format is
self-referential. Again this is important to
bear in mind for both scholars and students.
F
inally, it appears essential to mention the
pleasure participants have derived from
multimedia exploration. Very often they
would express surprise and admiration at the
wonders digital presentations could accom-
plish. Indeed, if most of the students and
scholars have access to written documents
when it comes to eighteenth-century cul-
ture, it is very seldom that they can simul-
taneously listen to music or contemplate
paintings from this era; in this respect, mul-
timedia enables the modern recreation of an
atmosphere that has long since vanished.
CONCLUSION
T
he results of this study can be sum-
marised as follows. First, to make the
most of digital environments one needs to
master their design. Secondly, the digital
contextualisation exemplified in
Georgian
Cities enhances scholars' and students'
awareness of data gathering and processing
on CD-ROMs but also in more tradition-
al modes of representation, taken individu-
ally; additionally, when juxtaposed, the same
modes of representation shed light on each
other. Thirdly, digital contextualisation in
the humanities sheds light on the meto-
nymical dimension of knowledge acquisi-
tion, when users' and designers' overlapping
perspectives are made plain, when disci-
plines echo one another, thus stressing the
importance of trans-disciplinary approach-
es, and when contextualisation compensates
for the lack of data available. Beyond this,
new learning pleasures can be derived from
digital aesthetics. In other words, because
they aptly increase our awareness of knowl-
edge's intrinsic complexity, multimedia
enhance pedagogical techniques.
D
I
VA - A
CADEMIC
A
RCHIVE
O
NLINE
E
VA
M
ÜLLER
, U
PPSALA
U
NIVERSITY
INTRODUCTION
T
he DiVA
25
publishing system enables
publishing in XML, treating the elec-
tronic copy of the document as the `digit-
al master' for both the electronic and print
versions. It was developed and is maintained
within the DiVA project based at Uppsala
University, Sweden (http://www.uu.se/).
The DiVA system has been in full opera-
tion since January 2003 and is used by a
number of universities in Nordic countries.
T
echnologies that support the long-
term preservation of digitally stored
documents are a part of the system solu-
tions. Each document is assigned a per-
sistent identifier, is stored (along with
checksums to verify integrity) in the live
repository, and the archive copy is stored
in a local depository (the DiVA Archive).
The copy is also transmitted to the relevant
national library digital archive.
26
The system
incorporates standards, recommendations,
and new XML technologies. The metadata
are stored in the DiVA Document Format,
a rich, locally developed and XML-based
schema. The transformation of this schema
enables the provision of various metada-
ta services, such as harvesting via OAI-
PMH, or automatic generation of catalogue
records for local and national catalogues.
27
A
ll documents published by local DiVA
systems can be searched and browsed
using a common interface known as the
DiVA ­ Academic Archive Online portal
(http://www.diva-portal.org). This allows
an enormous increase in the visibility of
the published documents.
T
his article presents a brief introduc-
tion to the DiVA system, focusing on
present functionality, ongoing development
activities, and co-operation.
THE DIVA PROJECT
T
he DiVA project team is based at the
Electronic Publishing Centre (EPC)
at Uppsala University Library (http://pub-
lications.uu.se/epcentre/). The Centre has
25 DiVA ­ Digitala Vetenskapliga Arkivet in Swedish, DiVA ­
Academic Archive Online in English
26 See E. Müller et al., "Archiving Workflow between a Local
Repository and the National Archive Experiences from the DiVA
Project" in Proceedings of the Third ECDL Workshop on Web Archives,
in conjunction with the 7th European Conference on Research and
Advanced Technologies for Digital Libraries in Trondheim, Norway,
21 August 2003. http://bibnum.bnf.fr/ecdl/2003/
27 For a comprehensive description of the DiVA system and the
DiVA project, see E. Müller et al., "The DiVA Project-Development
of an Electronic Publishing System" in D-Lib Magazine, vol. 9, no. 11,
2003. http://www.dlib.org/dlib/november03/muller/11muller.html
Uppsala University Library - the oldest Nordic research library with both
cultural heritage collections and innovative technological solutions.
©
DiV
A
pr
oject,

2004