background image
DigiCULT
.
Info
25
and there are now eleven universities in
this network.
29
Co-operation on the DiVA
project is open to all universities and pub-
licly financed research departments and the
number of consortia members is constantly
increasing.
T
he founding idea of the consortium is
not only to share products and tech-
nical solutions developed within the DiVA
project, but to exchange the experiences of
people working with individual implemen-
tations of the system and electronic pub-
lishing in general. Questions of common
interest are discussed on a regular basis and
a number of agreements supporting inter-
operability have been achieved within the
consortium. For example, the participating
universities have agreed upon a common
document format (the DiVA Document
Format) and a list of subject terms. This
made it possible to build the Diva portal
at http://www.diva-portal.org as a com-
mon interface to local repositories. Other
issues important for long-term access and
preservation (persistent identifiers, storage
formats, and metadata) are also addressed
within the consortium.
A
lthough, the component-based sys-
tem development methodology has
been used as the system has been built, the
model of the further development of DiVA
supports a co-operative effort. It also offers
a great advantage ­ the components can be
developed with simple functionality that is
sufficient for the dedicated function and, as
more resources and new demands
arise, a single component can be
replaced by a more advanced one.
Hopefully we will see more of
such co-operative development of
DiVA in the future.
CONCLUSIONS
B
uilding an infrastructure sup-
porting the publishing and
dissemination of research results is
a complex process and many fac-
tors have to be taken into con-
sideration when system choices are made.
The DiVA system is an example of a prac-
tical and operational solution that incorpo-
rates current standards and at the same time
makes it possible to implement upcoming
standards relatively easily and to add inno-
vative functionality. Additionally, the great
advantage of the system is its facility for
publishing full-text in XML and support-
ing long-term access and preservation. The
central issues are workflows, formats and
persistent identifiers. The format issues are
not only important in the context of meta-
data and long-term preservation of content,
but also in the context of the development
of the DiVA system. The benefit of a well-
structured and well-defined XML-based
format is to provide clear system interfaces
as well as advanced services. The DiVA sys-
tem has been designed to follow workflow
models that are practical for both authors
and production staff. This concept helps to
achieve efficiency and reduce costs, as well
as benefiting authors. The efficiency that we
have achieved and the recognition we have
received from authors and research com-
munities demonstrate how powerful tech-
nology can be when it is integrated with
user-friendly and (semi)automated work-
flows.
29 DiVA consortium members are:- Aarhus University, Denmark;
NTNU ­ Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway;
Jönköping University, Linköping University, The Royal Institute of
Technology in Stockholm, Stockholm University, Södertörns College,
Umeå University, Uppsala University, and Örebro University, Sweden.
Users of the DiVA Academic archive Online portal at Uppsala University
Library
©
DiV
A
pr
oject,

2004
ERPANET
P
RESERVATION
OF
B
ORN
-
DIGITAL
A
RT
W
ORKSHOP
THE FIRST WORD
T
INA
F
ISKE
, H
ISTORY
OF
A
RT
, U
NIVERSITY
OF
G
LASGOW
(
HTTP
://
WWW
.
ARTHIST
.
ARTS
.
GLA
.
AC
.
UK
/)
D
igital artworks and projects pose
numerous challenges to the collect-
ing, classificatory, documentation and pres-
ervation practices typical to the museum
world, and the notion of the fixed, mate-
rially unique, original artwork that it pri-
oritises. Digital artworks are typically
processural or temporal rather than fixed,
and are variously characterised as ephem-
eral, unstable or variable. They may explore
open or multiple authorship, be interactive,
participatory or `live'. They may take the
form of a networked installation; a digital
environment; a Web site or Web broadcast;
a hypertext story; custom and manipulable
software; a computer game; or an attach-
ment to an email. Frequently, they are
context-specific, or temporary in their real-
isation. If they are re-installed or re-created
at a later date, or made available elsewhere,
they might be re-versioned. Undoubtedly,
they will be subject to variability and
change in terms of their content, context
and constitution / through the manipula-
tion or interaction of a user; content mod-
ifications or updates by the author(s); but
also by the ongoing upgrades and develop-
ments in digital media.
A
key question for us today is whether
or not our museum collections should
be looking to collect, and thus to preserve
for posterity, digital art? Can those institu-