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DigiCULT
.
Info
28
D
IGITAL
R
ESOURCES
FOR
THE
H
UMANITIES
2004
D
AISY
A
BBOTT
& M
ARTIN
D
ONNELLY
,
D
IGI
CULT
O
nce again, the creators, custodi-
ans and users of Humanities dig-
ital resources gathered together to address
both the well-established and emerging
themes of the sector in the four-day Digital
Resources for the Humanities annual con-
ference. DigiCULT's third DRH was held
at the University of Newcastle (http://
www.ncl.ac.uk/), which, being the home
of The Digital Centre of Excellence (now
re-branded CODEWORKS: http://www.
ncl.ac.uk/coe/digitaltechnology.phtml),
The Newcastle Institute for the Arts,
Social Sciences and Humanities (NIASSH:
http://www.ncl.ac.uk/niassh/), Culture
Lab (http://www.ncl.ac.uk/niassh/culture-
lab/index.htm), and the Structural Images
North East project (SINE: http://sine.ncl.
ac.uk/), seemed well equipped to handle
the questions, challenges and issues posed
by around 150 conference attendees.
T
he key themes for DRH 2004 includ-
ed:
Methods in humanities computing;
Cross-sector exchange between heritage,
national and local government, and edu-
cation bodies;
Broadening the humanities computing
base;
New forms of scholarly publication.
T
ypically for DRH, a wide range of
papers and projects were presented,
thematically grouped into parallel sessions.
In addition to the papers on encoding
issues, preservation techniques, distribut-
ed resources, the visualisation and presen-
tation of content, content retrieval, ICT
support, cross-sector and -domain collabo-
ration, access and publication, there were a
number of panel discussions: `Humanities
Computing Mapping the Field';
`Including the Arts and Humanities in the
E-Science Agenda'; `Effective E-Learning';
and `A Generic Approach to Markup for
Complex Scholarly Materials'. These pan-
els were particularly interesting, in terms
of both the presentations of the speakers
and the responses of the audience. The ple-
nary sessions helped to contextualise issues
on a large scale in Monday's plenary, The
Right Honourable Chris Patten gave an
entertaining and insightful speech entitled
`Digital Europe: a key to the competitive-
ness of the EU'.
I
n addition to the scheduled events, there
was the opportunity for delegates to
examine the wealth of posters and exhibi-
tions around the conference hall, ranging
from large organisations providing gateways
to resources (e.g. Artifact: http://www.arti-
fact.ac.uk/, the Arts and Humanities Data
Service: http://www.ahds.ac.uk/, Humbul
Humanities Hub: http://www.humbul.
ac.uk/, and the Online Computer Libraries
Center: http://www.oclc.org/) to small-
scale university-based projects, such as
Cistercians in Yorkshire (already covered in
DigiCULT.Info Issue 6: http://www.digi-
cult.info/pages/newsletter.php). This year
,
the exhibitors included the DigiCULT
Forum, and we were pleased to demon-
strate our publications and services to the
delegates face to face.
B
ut of course there is more to DRH
than plenary sessions and poster pres-

HA
TII,

Uni
v
er
sity
of
Glasgo
w
,

2004

HA
TII,

Uni
v
er
sity
of
Glasgo
w
,

2004
Benedetto Benedetti of the Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, speaking on
The Pompeii project (http://pompei.sns.it)
Daisy Abbott and Martin Donnelly present the DigiCULT poster