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29
entations. Newcastle`s reputation as a party
town was not lost on the delegates, many
of whom took the opportunity of their rare
spare time to explore the pubs, clubs and
restaurants of areas like the Bigg Market
and the town's famous Quayside.
A
fter we had sampled the delights of
the Hatton Gallery, and the Mayor's
Civic Hall in previous social events, the
conference's closing dinner took place in
the function suite of Newcastle United
FC's landmark stadium, St James's Park,
with early-bird delegates being treated
to a tour of the historic ground and tro-
phy room. In truth, most of the latecom-
ers got a taste of the city's fervour for
football as well - every pub in the vicin-
ity seemed well decorated with Magpies
memorabilia, and there was no shortage of
fans willing and able to give their opin-
ions on the recent sacking of Toon manager
Bobby Robson. Few could have predicted
the arrival of NUFC-brand wine on our
tables along with the starters, but fewer still
refrained from sampling it. After a huge-
ly enjoyable evening, some hailed taxis and
headed for home, while others continued
late into the night. Commiserations, finally,
to those rudely awoken by a fire alarm at
dawn the next morning!
P
apers from previous DRH conferenc-
es have been published in a number
of volumes by the Office for Humanities
Communication (http://www.kcl.ac.uk/
humanities/cch/ohc/books.html), and also
in Literary and Linguistic Computing (http://
www3.oup.co.uk/litlin/). DRH 2004
papers are likely to be available in mid-
2005.
D
RH 2005 will take place from 4-8
September 2005 at the University of
Lancaster (http://www.lancs.ac.uk/).

HA
TII,

Uni
v
er
sity
of
Glasgo
w
,

2004

HA
TII,

Uni
v
er
sity
of
Glasgo
w
,

2004
Delegates meet the Mayor and Mayoress at the Civic Hall reception
The Hatton Gallery, University of Newcastle
A
recent study examined digital library
production centres and collection
development policies at various universi-
ties around North America. It found that
ways are being sought for digital libraries
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libraries), and better integrated into the tra-
ditional library environment. Obviously,
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tutions, but the main areas of focus were
found to be content development and
manipulation of both content and library
processes.
I
t was also found that many people
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use of these technologies into the work of
an institution.
A
hard copy of this entire report can
be purchased from http://www.
researchandmarkets.com/reports/c4700/
priced at
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D
IGITAL
A
CADEMIC
L
IBRARY
R
EPORT