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44
arts, etc. do not really benefit from sim-
ply accessing online collections. There is no
`real' experience in gazing at images online
most of us still prefer to visit an art exhi-
bition with a friend and there is also lit-
tle mediation of cultural knowledge when
reading the descriptive metadata attached to
images, etc.
H
owever, there are millions of Euros
being spent on digitising heritage
resources, partly in response to a mix of
educational and commercial ideas that may
not deliver, because the next step towards
creating engaging cultural experiences with
these resources is not being considered.
I
f we stick for a moment with the RTD
agenda you mentioned, where is this
heading, and have you been able to identify
specific goals yet?
G
enerally, the goals are to drive tech-
nologies that drive cultural industries
as well as enhanced services of the cul-
tural and memory organisations. However,
we have entered the age of the experi-
ence economy, as described by the market-
ing experts Pine & Gilmore. Consumers
today take service for granted; what they
are seeking are unique, meaningful and
memorable experiences. So the next wave
in applications for digital culture and her-
itage should bring considerable enhance-
ments in interactions that are engaging and
immersive: you experience something, you
achieve something, you learn something.
So it's about the individual experience,
achievement, even transformation through
inspiration. Of course, experiences are often
shared within groups, so novel applications
will also include, for example, virtual game-
like environments involving like-minded
users.
H
ow does this relate to the vision of
ambient intelligence that strong-
ly underpins the Information Society
Technologies programme?
R
ight, a major challenge for the cul-
tural and heritage organisations is
to realise or, rather, strongly connect to
this vision, and make it work for them and
their customers. The necessary massive dis-
tributed and embedded computing, smart
networked devices, novel interfaces, posi-
tioning and context-awareness technologies,
etc. will over the coming years be delivered
by the industry. However, when it comes
to the experiences I mentioned, new forms
of collaboration and true interdisciplinary
efforts will be needed. The key word here
is experience prototyping, and cultural
hotspots such as historic city centres, muse-
ums, science centres or heritage sites should
be strongly involved in this.
F
inally, what can we look forward to at
next year's symposium?
L
et us first not forget that many of the
concepts we have discussed today are
seldom heard of in the day-to-day activities
of heritage institutions and, given the very
experimental nature of most of these tech-
nologies demonstrated, rightly so. Therefore,
next year's event will continue to look at
promising technologies that are refining our
research agenda, but we will also look at
near-to-market applications, to identify the
cultural heritage sector's unique transforma-
tion needs so as to ensure early take-up.
A
lso, to help us understand the impact
of the emerging digital heritage space
there is a need to extend the application
backdrop of our investigation, so you can
expect demonstrations and application sce-
narios of cultural hotspots with tourism and
learning add-ons.
F
rom the perspective of Salzburg
Research, we would also like to see
sessions dedicated to cultural experience
prototyping as well as new architectures
that support the morphing of applications,
environments and cultural resources into an
intelligent digital space.
T
W O
G
U I D E S
TO
D
I G I T I S AT I O N
:
A N
A R C H I VA L
P E R S P E C T I V E
T
he NINCH Guide to Good Practice
in the Digital Representation and
Management of Cultural Heritage Materials,
2003, available at http://www.nyu.edu/its/
humanities/ninchguide/
T
echnical Guidelines for Digital Content
Creation Programmes, working draft
version 0.06, 2003, available at http:www.
minervaeurope.org
Michael Moss, a Research Professor
in Archival Studies based at the
Humanities Advanced Technology and
Information Institute (http://www.
hatii.arts.gla.ac.uk/) at the University
of Glasgow, presents his reaction to
two digitisation guides for the herit-
age sector and the future of archivists
in the digital information age.
53
I
t is difficult to know how to report on
these two guides manuals of which
every archivist in North America and
Europe should be aware. It is like being
asked to say which car owner's handbook
is the best. I was recently being driven in
heavy rain by my brother in my sister's
car in deluging rain in southwest Scotland
when we followed a lorry into a flood. The
car stalled and I plunged into the flood and
pushed it out. `Where is the handbook?' my
brother demanded, `What does it say about
inundation?' As inventive as we could be in
the use of the index, we could, of course,
find nothing, except to consult a recognised

53 This review was delivered at the ICA Congress in Vienna in the
digitisation workshop. For more information about this event, see
http://www.wien2004.ica.org, and to search DigiCULT's database
of future cultural and scientific heritage events, please visit http://
www.digicult.info/pages/events.php. It should be emphasised that,

although the NINCH guide was authored in HATII, Professor Moss
had no connection with it.