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51
T
he real business potential for the use
of 3D cultural heritage models may
lie in their use outside the cultural heritage
sector. The group pointed to their poten-
tial use in the cultural tourism market and
agreed that this may be an extremely lucra-
tive market for 3D cultural heritage virtual
models. For this market to be tapped, the
cultural heritage sector must begin creat-
ing synergies with other disciplines. Like
the others, this group felt that increased co-
operation and improved communication
between all stakeholders would be essen-
tial for the full business value of 3D cultural
heritage models to be realised.
CONCLUSIONS
O
ver the course of the two days, the
workshop highlighted that the chal-
lenges presented by 3D digitisation and
distribution provide an opportunity to inte-
grate previously disparate groups. Increased
co-operation between the cultural herit-
age sector and other stakeholders will be
key in the sustainable development of cul-
tural heritage 3D digitisation and distri-
bution. The workshop has led directly to
new co-operative efforts between many of
the participants. For example, MINERVA
and BRICKS plan to work together in the
near future. There are also plans to estab-
lish a Virtual Heritage Centre (VHC) in
Rome. Much work remains to be done
on the establishment of industry standards
with regard to formats, compression algo-
rithms and colour accuracy. Collaboration
with software and hardware developers will
be crucial in this endeavour. Co-operative
efforts will also be necessary for eradicat-
ing the `soft barriers' identified as impeding
the development of 3D digitisation and dis-
tribution among the cultural heritage sec-
tor. This workshop proved to be extremely
valuable as a means of identifying the cur-
rent state of the art and future trends in the
field of 3D digitisation and distribution. As
3D technology advances, it will be essen-
tial that the lines of communication remain
open between the various stakeholders. To
that end, planning has already begun on the
next European Workshop on Culture and
Technology: 3D Content Digitisation and
Distribution, to be held in the framework
of EVA 2005 Florence.
73

Da
vid
Da
wson,

2004
T
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D I G I TA L
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E A L A N D
73 For more details of this and other events, see DigiCULT's events
database at http://www.digicult.info/pages/events.php
R
OSS
S
OMERVILLE
,
P
RODUCTION
M
ANAGER
, T
E
A
RA
(O
NLINE
E
NCYCLOPEDIA
OF
N
EW
Z
EALAND
),
M
INISTRY
FOR
C
ULTURE
& H
ERITAGE
T
E
M
ANATU
T
AONGA
THE VISION AND THE GOAL
S
ince July 2002, a team at the Ministry
for Culture and Heritage in Wellington,
New Zealand, has been engaged in the
challenge of creating a new, born-digital,
online Encyclopedia of New Zealand.
T
he project, dubbed `Te Ara', Maori for
`the pathway', will run for about 10
years in total, publishing a comprehensive
guide to the natural environment, histo-
ry, culture, economics, institutions, peo-
ples and social development of the country.
An important feature of the encyclope-
dia will be its Maori content. The Web
site, http://www.TeAra.govt.nz/, will go
live in December 2004 (a public launch
will take place in February 2005), with
its first theme, New Zealanders, present-
ing 100 entries about the indigenous and
immigrant groups making up the present-
day New Zealand population. In addition,
a series of overview entries, New Zealand
in Brief, will provide succinct summaries
of topics to be treated in greater detail in
subsequent releases. Ultimately the site will
include some 2,000 entries; about 2.5 mil-