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the three themes outlined above continually
recurred in papers, panels and keynote
sessions. Finally this report can not con-
clude without mentioning the closing key-
note address by Ted Nelson. Provocative,
challenging, engaging, humorous and
insightful are just some of the adjectives
that describe his speech on how humanists
can fight back against the tyranny and
restrictions of the hierarchical hypertext
system.
I
t well reflected the critical, forward
looking and confident community of
DRH 2002.
countries can afford.
- The necessity to develop skills and
standards to present local written sources
adequately in an environment where skills
development opportunities are available.
- The lack of local reference model inter-
large they avoided simply being descriptive,
addressed broader issues of applicability, and
yet remained accessible for the novice dele-
gate.This is another sign of the growing
maturity, understanding and interdisciplinary
nature that has developed in the community.
There appears to be a critical mass of users
who have learnt from the mistakes of the
past and are applying technology in rele-
vant, innovative and transferable ways.
O
f note under this theme were
Osborne, Anderson and Gerencser
on the production of digital resources
through co-operation between educators
and archivists. Spaeth's paper on the appli-
cation and analysis of probate records using
XML as a textbase alternative to relational
databases was a highlight in this regard.
In a similar vein Lunberg explored the inte-
gration of the Master XML DTD with a
Z39.50-compliant database and the delivery
of search results in MARC format.
Summary
T
here were many more valuable and
challenging papers presented at DRH
2002 than can be reported here. However,
be summarised in the following five issues:
- The lack of sufficient funds to maintain
conservation and preservation programmes
in their institutions.As a result, digitisation
and digital preservation projects are a
luxury that few institutions in CEE
T
he pace of modern development and
globalisation increases the difficulties
faced by communities and governments as
they work to preserve their cultural heritage.
Providing access and visibility to the rich
diversity of Europe's cultural heritage is
essential to ensuring that cultural diffe-
rences and similarities play a key role in
the integration processes.
N
ew information technologies offer a
wide range of means and devices
for providing access to, and contributing
to, the preservation of cultural heritage.
Although, in recent decades, the impor-
tance of cultural identification and online
access to heritage resources has been in the
limelight all over Europe, in Central and
Eastern Europe (CEE) electronic publica-
tion remains a challenge for those involved
in the management and preservation of
cultural resources. Specialists in Central
and Eastern Europe only have ad hoc
opportunities to gain support for projects
to develop electronic resources and subse-
quently are confronted by many technical
difficulties and shortages of skills.
T
he concerns of curators in Central
and Eastern European countries can
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