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DigiCULT
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APTURE THE
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MAGINATION
DAMS
these assets reduces the wasted time other-
wise spent searching, analysing search
results, and verifying possession of the
most current version.'
C
reative workers do not function in a
command-and-control environment,
acknowledges Moon.You have to sort of
seduce them to make them more produc-
tive by using a DAMS. One way to do
this is to make the value they bring to the
company more transparent. Moon says:
`At the moment, the value they create
often goes unnoticed. A DAMS can help
in making it visible.That can have finan-
cial implications for them but it also gives
possibilities for `branding' their own style.
That, in turn, can help in getting better
`gigs'. For the company the value of digi-
tal assets can be correlated to business
results. It creates a system of accountability
where earlier the contributions from crea-
tive departments were much harder to
measure. Apart from increasing the effecti-
veness of your marketing efforts and the
productivity of your knowledge workers, a
DAMS also gives you an unmatched level
of insight into your business processes.'
A
nother important incentive for know-
ledge workers is to be part of a
trusted network of colleagues and to feel
needed as a source of expertise. Referring
to the book The Social Life of Information
by John Sealy Brown and Paul Duguid,
Moon points to the fact that networks of
practitioners often form the principal
repository of essential knowledge. Moon:
`This tacit knowledge, which is circulating
among knowledge workers, is very diffi-
cult to capture.You can only access it by
asking the right questions. Most of the
time these are `what'-questions. Not `how'-
questions: these are answered in the hand-
T
hrough some sort of creative process,
knowledge workers generate ideas
and concepts which precipitate in texts,
photos, drawings, graphic designs, assets
that today are digital by nature or can be
digitised. `By properly managing these
assets you can greatly increase the produc-
tivity of knowledge workers', says Michael
Moon, president of Gistics Inc. Gistics is a
California-based company that researches
return on investment for the adoption of
new technologies. Every year they publish
a market report on digital asset manage-
ment. According to their latest estimates
(2002) the market for digital asset manage-
ment amounts to $60 billion per year by
2005.
D
igital assets differ from `content' in
that they have an economic value.
Because they can be re-used and re-
expressed over a longer time period their
development costs can be capitalised and
put on the balance sheet. Furthermore,
there is the huge burst in productivity
that digital asset management can bring to
companies and organisations. According to
Moon, digital asset management increases
productivity in two ways:`First, retrieval of
files that one can reuse `as is'or re-express,
that is, add new value or creativity, can sti-
mulate the creative process. Asset reposito-
ries make it easier for knowledge workers
to build and share a library of reusable
components. Second, convenient access to
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Michael Moon
Salzburg Research