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information. Moon: `You can compare it
with the layered drawings of the human
body you find in textbooks', he says. `The
first layer is the skin, the next is the mus-
cles, then the blood vessels, the lymph
system and so on. In a DAMS you can
hyperlink the image to all kinds of infor-
mation and make renderings for different
kinds of users. From school children to
medical doctors and from lay people to
researchers. It really becomes a body of
information.The picture itself becomes a
visual navigation tool.'
T
herefore, Moon envisages that, by
combining DAMS and new visuali-
sation approaches, cultural heritage orga-
nisations will be enabled to provide the
wealth of their collections and related
knowledge in fascinating new ways to
their different users, be they school
children or researchers.
books. Neither are they "why"-questions
because these refer to motives and rationa-
lisations. It is mostly "what"-questions,
because they help people in establishing
category and context. Good, well-formed
questions give you access to this wealth of
knowledge.That is what knowledge
management is all about. Hence a digital
asset management system includes a database
of well-formed questions and associates
them to digital files that may contain those
answers sought by others.'
C
apturing tacit knowledge in a DAMS
is important because it puts the out-
come in the right perspective and that
helps in telling the good stories, Moon
says. Storytelling? `Indeed', he continues,
`knowledge is not transferred by reciting
data, but by telling stories. A well-told
story is an important vehicle to get know-
ledge across, as every teacher can tell you.
Not only in classrooms but also in compa-
nies. A good executive knows both how
to listen and how to tell stories.To his
staff, to his investors, to his customers.'
T
he effectiveness of transferring
knowledge by storytelling is greatly
enhanced by images.That a picture says
more than a thousand words is common
wisdom among editors of newspapers and
magazines.The same goes for graphics.
Moon: `Images can convey context, scope,
causality and hierarchy.They visualise
ideas and concepts in a straightforward
way. It is not for nothing that thousands
of executives, researchers, teachers and
other people who want to convey know-
ledge use MS PowerPoint. Although it is
a foul program to work with, it can com-
municate information more quickly and
by that can increase productivity.'
T
he next big leap will be images with
hyperlinks, hot spots on the image
which guide you through a wealth of
I
NFORMATION
S
ECTIONS
T
hroughout October and November,
UNESCO's World Heritage
Convention (see http://whc.unesco.org)
will celebrate its 30th anniversary with
events related to Technology and New
Media for Documentation, Preservation,
Management, Sustainable Tourism and
Education.The UNESCO World Heritage
Centre, in partnership with cultural and
scientific societies and institutions, universi-
ties and governments worldwide, is organi-
sing a VIRTUAL CONGRESS with series
of themed Conferences focusing on issues
of World Heritage in the Digital Age.The
six themed conferences take place in:
- Alexandria, EGYPT: Heritage
Management Mapping: GIS &
Multimedia
- Beijing, CHINA: Architecture,World
Heritage, & Tourism
- Dakar, SENEGAL:Teaching World
Heritage in Africa
- Mexico City, MEXICO: Management
of Heritage Cities: Planning for Mixed
Use & Social Equity
- Paris, FRANCE: Elected
Representatives & World Heritage:
Challenges of Decentralisation
- Strasbourg, FRANCE: Space
Applications for Heritage Conservation
Tying the physical gatherings together,
the encompassing VIRTUAL CONGRESS
will link these eight events through the
Internet and new media and via a printed
colour Joint Proceedings with accompa-
nying DVD of the best research and
media projects of WORLD HERITAGE
IN THE DIGITAL AGE.
http://www.virtualworldheritage.org
30
TH
A
NNIVERSARY OF
UNESCO'
S
W
ORLD
H
ERITAGE
C
ONVENTION