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27
IV SITUATION ANALYSIS
Cultural Sector
1996
Electronic publishing,
multimedia tools
Content not yet adapted for new
technologies
Therefore, highest potential for
content owners
Promising new organisational
structures:"flat virtual
enterprises" with networked
creative knowledge workers
Cultural industries will easily
adapt to electronic production
and delivery
Mergers, mergers, mergers
Need to position oneself in the
new (e-publishing) markets as
soon as possible
Cultural Heritage Sector
2001
Efficient but still rather complex
tools with low usability
Besides collection management
systems, not many tools for
cultural heritage sector
Digitisation of cultural
objects/collections without
focus ("accidental digitisation")
Cultural heritage institutions
rely on traditional hierarchical
structures
They lack business view and
competency
New media & IT-skills often
missing
Cultural heritage institutions
enter into partnerships mostly
within own sector: e.g. libraries
co-operate on union catalogues
Cultural Heritage Sector
2006
New generation of easy to
handle tools for domain experts
and other target groups (e.g.
teachers)
Co-operative authoring tools
Tools for defining automated
workflows and data capturing in
integrated systems
Clear digitisation policy and
strategies focused on particular
themes (clear concepts: which
collections, how: methods &
standards, e.g. of documentation)
Traditional institutions: still
relatively inflexible (generation
gap)
Some transfer through
partnerships with businesses
New competencies & skills
incorporated through new
personnel, best practice examples
New types of cultural heritage
organisations: cultural networks,
service providers
Clear cross-sector partnerships
on key issues, e.g. standards
Technical support organisations
Strategic partnerships with new
types of cultural organisations
and businesses
Well established co-operative
frameworks across sectors
Tools
Content
Management and organisation
Strategic partnerships and co-operation